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GENDER GAP INDEX: A CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF INDIA’S POSITION AND PROGRESS

Keerthana.B.S

Research Scholar, Department of Economics, University of Kerala, Thiruvanthapuram, India.

Abstract


Are men and women equal here? It’s been great to ask while we live in India, the largest democratic country in the World. The truth is that in a complex country where customs, beliefs, power, and rights are all confused, the gender gap is dangerously growing high. This year too the World Economic Forum is reminding us about the growing gender gap in the country. In 2021, India ranks 140th out of 156 countries in Global Gender Gap Index. Its noteworthy as compared to 2020, India stands 28 places behind in Global Gender Index. Despite a high economic growth and surfeit of government measures to create gender equality in the country, gender gap still exists. It has been widely argued that “Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world”. This article evaluates the gender gap that still persist in India and the reasons for the increasing gender inequality. The rising Gender Inequality will be a challenge to the sustainable development of India. Therefore, the Government must plan and implement effective policies to reduce the mounting gender inequality.

Keywords


gender inequality, gender gap, global gender index, discrimination.

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To cite this article


Keerthana.B.S., (2021). Gender Gap Index: A Critical Analysis of India’s Position and Progress. John Foundation Journal of EduSpark, 3(1), 14-22.

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