AN EXPLORATORY STUDY ON THE PROSPECTIVE COLLISION OF EXPERIENTIAL MARKETING AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE FOR THE INDIAN ECONOMY
June 30, 2020

THE DEMONSTRATION OF SELF-COMPLEXITY- A WINNICOTTIAN PERSPECTIVE WITH POST COLONIAL MUSINGS ON THE SELECT WORKS OF SHASHI DESHPANDE

Anandhi M

Professor & Head, Department of English, Sri Ramakrishna College of Arts & Science for Women, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

Abstract


The present paper examines the selected novels of Shashi Despande under the clinical dimension of British psychoanalyst, Donald Winnicott’s psychoanalytic premises. The research is done on the integration of psychology, gender studies, and Indian literature. Though early studies have explored the extension of both interdisciplinary realms, no integrative work has focused on the Winnicottian view of Selfhood and woman in literature.  Therefore, there is a need to address the actual psychological transformation that occurs in the personas of literature in the Winnicottian perspective. Postmodern writings especially Indian discourse in English literature also demonstrates exemplary responsiveness to self-complexity.  A psychoanalytic explanation is crucial to analyze the plot construction as well as its developmental conceptualization. The Winnicottian framework to the present study attributes a clinical sensitivity over the narrative and thematic dimensions of self-experience. Winnicott’s concept of self and transitional space has more application to the gender issue of women in its base of psychological structure. The tension between the liberating and constraining views of selfhood is exemplified by the living dynamic Indian woman writer, Shashi Despande to create an entire body of fiction. Her writings are based not only on observations of external behavior but also on Despande. The study attempts to illustrate a thematic and theoretical framework of the internal journey of feminine sensibilities.  The inner turmoil of a woman resulted as a clash between her own knowledge and social reality is portrayed as a major theme in the works of Shashi ‘struggled self’ of a woman in between her psychological growth and societal constraints. It is a straightforward journey into the psyche of Indian women characters that are torn by the discord between the individual and the surrounding. In the scenario, the present study is primarily concerned upon the female protagonists of Despande’s selected novels that include  Indu in ‘Roots and Shadows’; Saru in ‘The Dark Holds No Terror’; Jaya in ‘That Long Silence’; Sumi in ‘A Matter of Time’ and Urmila in ‘The Binding Vine’ respectively.

Keywords


demonstration, self-complexity, winnicottian perspective, postcolonial, shashi deshpande

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To cite this article


Anandhi, M. (2020). The Demonstration of Self-Complexity-A Winnicottian Perspective with Post Colonial Musings on the Select Works of Shashi Deshpande. John Foundation Journal of EduSpark, 2(2), 1-8.

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